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FAQ

Cotton Panama is a closely woven, heavy cotton fabric with a sturdy texture and a soft matte finish. It is very durable and the natural fibres will wash well.

A pattern, often floral, is “sewn” (embroidered) onto the fabric by machine, resulting in a slightly raised design adding interest and texture to the material. The embroidery can be of the same shade as the fabric or one or more colours to give additional detail.

There are two types of silk, natural or pure silk, and faux silk. Pure silk is made from the cocoon of silk worms, whilst faux silk is manufactured polyester. Silk curtains are known to add a touch of luxury and elegance to any decor but they can be extremely expensive and are very delicate and therefore dry clean only. Faux silk curtains have the similar wonderfully luxurious appearance, deep colours and warmth of pure silk and yet are washable, can be ironed on low temperatures and are available at amazingly affordable prices. You can now have modern ring top faux silk curtains as well as beautiful embroidered and taffeta faux silk curtains. Taffeta has a beautiful shimmer, and like satin, is wonderfully soft and really has no texture.

Plain satin weave is a basic weave, typically with a lustrous, glossy surface and a matt back. The fabrics are woven in a way that there are no visible interlacing patterns, resulting in the material having a smooth shiny surface. Satin Weave will provide an opulent feel to any room.

A general term for a printed cotton fabric. Curtain fabrics with printed designs, such as chintz and cretonne, are frequently called “prints” whilst small printed patterns on cotton materials are sometimes known as Grandmother prints. Printed fabrics were originally all hand block printed but the majority are now machine printed.

Woven Chenille is often manufactured in cotton but can in fact also consist of silk, wool and artificial fibres. It is manufactured with short lengths of yarn (the “pile”) being placed between two “core yarns”. The yarn is then twisted together resulting in Chenille being incredibly soft and looking different in every direction. The fibres catch the light differently and can actually look iridescent.

Woven Dobby gets its unusual name from the “Dobby Loom” on which it is woven. The material is characterised by small geometric patterns and extra texture in the cloth. Woven fabric consists of “warp” and “weft” threads and with Woven Dobby these can be the same or different colours. If satin threads are used they enhance the pattern, giving a particularly interesting design.

Jacquard fabrics use a variety of fibres and blends of fibres and are characterised by woven or knitted designs with complex, repeated patterns.

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